1: Science and Engineering Practices

H.E.1: The student will use the science and engineering practices, including the processes and skills of scientific inquiry, to develop understandings of science content.

H.E.1A: The practices of science and engineering support the development of science concepts, develop the habits of mind that are necessary for scientific thinking, and allow students to engage in science in ways that are similar to those used by scientists and engineers.

H.E.1A.1: Ask questions to

H.E.1A.1.1: generate hypotheses for scientific investigations,

Pendulum Clock

H.E.1A.1.3: extend the results of investigations or challenge scientific arguments or claims.

Pendulum Clock
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

H.E.1A.2: Develop, use, and refine models to

H.E.1A.2.1: understand or represent phenomena, processes, and relationships,

Carbon Cycle
Determining a Spring Constant
Erosion Rates
Programmable Rover
River Erosion
Weathering

H.E.1A.2.2: test devices or solutions, or

Programmable Rover
Trebuchet

H.E.1A.2.3: communicate ideas to others.

Erosion Rates
Ocean Mapping

H.E.1A.3: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to answer questions, test hypotheses, and develop explanations:

H.E.1A.3.1: formulate scientific questions and testable hypotheses based on credible scientific information,

Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

H.E.1A.3.2: identify materials, procedures, and variables,

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock
Real-Time Histogram
Sight vs. Sound Reactions

H.E.1A.3.3: use appropriate laboratory equipment, technology, and techniques to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and

Programmable Rover
Triple Beam Balance

H.E.1A.3.4: record and represent data in an appropriate form. Use appropriate safety procedures.

Diffusion
Erosion Rates
Pendulum Clock
Programmable Rover
Real-Time Histogram

H.E.1A.4: Analyze and interpret data from informational texts and data collected from investigations using a range of methods (such as tabulation, graphing, or statistical analysis) to

H.E.1A.4.1: reveal patterns and construct meaning,

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Erosion Rates
Pendulum Clock
Programmable Rover
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

H.E.1A.4.2: support or refute hypotheses, explanations, claims, or designs, or

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Erosion Rates
Pendulum Clock
Programmable Rover
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

H.E.1A.4.3: evaluate the strength of conclusions.

Diffusion
Effect of Environment on New Life Form
Pendulum Clock
Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

H.E.1A.5: Use mathematical and computational thinking to

H.E.1A.5.1: use and manipulate appropriate metric units,

Erosion Rates

H.E.1A.5.2: express relationships between variables for models and investigations, or

Determining a Spring Constant
Pendulum Clock

H.E.1A.6: Construct explanations of phenomena using

H.E.1A.6.1: primary or secondary scientific evidence and models,

Big Bang Theory - Hubble's Law
Erosion Rates
Programmable Rover

H.E.1A.6.2: conclusions from scientific investigations,

Programmable Rover

H.E.1A.6.4: data communicated in graphs, tables, or diagrams.

Big Bang Theory - Hubble's Law
Seasons Around the World

H.E.1A.8: Obtain and evaluate scientific information to

H.E.1A.8.3: develop models,

Carbon Cycle

H.E.1A.8.4: evaluate hypotheses, explanations, claims, or designs or

Temperature and Sex Determination - Metric

H.E.1B: Technology is any modification to the natural world created to fulfill the wants and needs of humans. The engineering design process involves a series of iterative steps used to solve a problem and often leads to the development of a new or improved technology.

H.E.1B.1: Construct devices or design solutions using scientific knowledge to solve specific problems or needs:

H.E.1B.1.1: ask questions to identify problems or needs,

Sight vs. Sound Reactions

H.E.1B.1.3: generate and communicate ideas for possible devices or solutions,

Programmable Rover

H.E.1B.1.4: build and test devices or solutions,

Programmable Rover
Trebuchet

H.E.1B.1.5: determine if the devices or solutions solved the problem and refine the design if needed, and

Programmable Rover
Trebuchet

H.E.1B.1.6: communicate the results.

Programmable Rover

2: Astronomy

H.E.2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the structure, properties, and history of the observable universe.

H.E.2A: Earth is a tiny part of a vast universe that has developed over a huge expanse of time. At the center of Earth’s solar system is one local star, the Sun. It is just one of a vast number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, which is just one of a vast number of galaxies in the observable universe. The study of the light spectra and brightness of stars is used to identify compositional elements of stars, their movements, and their distances from Earth. Nearly all observable matter in the universe formed and continues to form within the cores of stars. The universe began with a period of extreme and rapid expansion and has been expanding ever since.

H.E.2A.2: Use the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to classify stars and explain the life cycles of stars (including the Sun).

H-R Diagram

H.E.2A.4: Construct and analyze scientific arguments to support claims about the origin of the universe (including the red shift of light from distant galaxies, the measured composition of stars and nonstellar gases, and the cosmic background radiation).

Big Bang Theory - Hubble's Law

H.E.2B: The solar system consists of the Sun and a collection of objects of varying sizes and conditions – including planets and their moons – that have predictable patterns of movement. These patterns can be explained by gravitational forces and conservation laws, and in turn explains many large-scale phenomena observed on Earth. Kepler’s laws describe common features of the motions of orbiting objects, including their elliptical paths around the Sun. The solar system appears to have formed from a disk of dust and gas, drawn together by gravity.

H.E.2B.3: Use mathematical and computational thinking to explain the motion of an orbiting object in the solar system.

Orbital Motion - Kepler's Laws

3: Earth’s Geosphere

H.E.3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the internal and external dynamics of Earth’s geosphere.

H.E.3A: Evidence indicates Earth’s interior is divided into a solid inner core, a liquid outer core, a solid (but flowing) mantle and solid crust. Although the crust is solid, it is in constant motion and is recycled through time. Plate tectonics is the unifying theory that explains the past and current movements of the rocks at Earth’s surface and provides a coherent account of its geological history. Weathering (physical and chemical) and soil formation are a result of the interactions of Earth’s geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. All forms of resource extraction and land use have associated economic, social, environmental, and geopolitical costs, risks, and benefits. Natural hazards and other geological events have shaped the course of human history.

H.E.3A.1: Analyze and interpret data to explain the differentiation of Earth’s internal structure using

H.E.3A.1.3: data from seismic waves, and

Earthquakes 1 - Recording Station

H.E.3A.2: Analyze and interpret data from ocean topography, correlation of rock assemblages, the fossil record, the role of convection current, and the action at plate boundaries to explain the theory of plate tectonics.

Plate Tectonics

H.E.3A.6: Develop and use models to explain how various rock formations on the surface of Earth result from geologic processes (including weathering, erosion, deposition, and glaciation).

Erosion Rates
Weathering

H.E.3A.7: Plan and conduct controlled scientific investigations to determine the factors that affect the rate of weathering.

Weathering

H.E.3B: The sustainability of human societies and the biodiversity that supports them requires responsible management of natural resources. Human transformation of the natural environment can contribute to the frequency and intensity of some natural hazards.

H.E.3B.1: Obtain and communicate information to explain how the formation, availability, and use of ores and fossil fuels impact the environment.

Carbon Cycle

4: Earth’s Paleobiosphere

H.E.4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic relationship between Earth’s conditions over geologic time and the diversity of organisms.

H.E.4A: Living things have changed the makeup of Earth’s geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere over geological time. Organisms ranging from bacteria to human beings may contribute to the global carbon cycle. They may influence the global climate by modifying the chemical makeup of the atmosphere. As Earth changes, life on Earth adapts and evolves to those changes. Just as life influences components of the Earth System, changes in the Earth System influences life.

H.E.4A.7: Develop and use models to predict the effects of an environmental change (such as the changing life forms, tectonic change, or human activity) on global carbon cycling.

Carbon Cycle

5: Earth’s Atmosphere – Weather and Climate

H.E.5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics of Earth’s atmosphere.

H.E.5A: Weather is the condition of the atmosphere at a particular location at a particular time. Weather is primarily determined by the angle and amount (time) of sunlight. Climate is the general weather conditions over a long period of time and is influenced by many factors.

H.E.5A.2: Develop and use models to predict and explain how the angle of solar incidence and Earth’s axial tilt impact

H.E.5A.2.1: the length of daylight,

Seasons: Why do we have them?

H.E.5A.2.3: the distribution of sunlight in any location, and

Seasons: Why do we have them?

H.E.5A.2.4: seasonal changes.

Seasons: Why do we have them?

H.E.5A.3: Analyze and interpret data to predict local and national weather conditions on the basis of the relationship among the movement of air masses, pressure systems, and frontal boundaries.

Weather Maps - Metric

H.E.5A.4: Analyze and interpret data of pressure differences, the direction of winds, and areas of uneven heating to explain how convection determines local wind patterns (including land/sea breezes, mountain/valley breezes, Chinook winds, and monsoons).

Coastal Winds and Clouds - Metric
Convection Cells

H.E.5A.5: Construct explanations for the formation of severe weather conditions (including tornadoes, hurricanes, thunderstorms, and blizzards) using evidence from temperature, pressure and moisture conditions.

Hurricane Motion - Metric

H.E.5A.8: Analyze scientific arguments regarding the nature of the relationship between human activities and climate change.

Coral Reefs 2 - Biotic Factors

6: Earth’s Hydrosphere

H.E.6: The student will demonstrate an understanding of Earth’s freshwater and ocean systems.

H.E.6A: Water is an essential resource on Earth. Organisms (including humans) on Earth depend on water for life. Its unique physical and chemical properties are important to the dynamics of Earth systems. Multiple factors affect the quality, availability, and distribution of Earth’s water.

H.E.6A.1: Analyze and interpret data to describe and compare the physical and chemical properties of saltwater and freshwater.

Pond Ecosystem

H.E.6A.4: Analyze and interpret data of a local drainage basin to predict how changes caused by human activity and other factors influence the hydrology of the basin and amount of water available for use in the ecosystem.

GMOs and the Environment

H.E.6A.5: Analyze and interpret data to describe how the quality of the water in drainage basins is influenced by natural and human factors (such as land use, domestic and industrial waste, weather/climate conditions, topography of the river channel, pollution, or flooding).

Nitrogen Cycle

H.E.6A.6: Develop and use models to explain how groundwater processes affect limestone formations leading to the formation of caves and karst topography.

Weathering

H.E.6A.7: Obtain and communicate information to explain how the convection of ocean water due to temperature and density influence the circulation of oceans.

Convection Cells

Correlation last revised: 5/18/2021

This correlation lists the recommended Gizmos for this state's curriculum standards. Click any Gizmo title below for more information.